Archive for the ‘Pork’ Category

>Spareribs with Pineapple in Oyster Sauce

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It has been a long time. My harddrive is already full of food pictures that are waiting to be published here. My baby is already 5 months old yesterday and since September, we have moved to a new apartment and I have started a new job. Our new place is nice. It is a place where everybody still says “Ohayou” (Good morning) to each other and also offer you produce from their gardens when harvest time comes. Although we are far from the conveniences that city living offers, we are loving every minute that we are here. My husband is particularly loving the fact that there is a supermarket nearby which sells big chunks of meat at a relatively cheaper price than the usual supermarkets. And thus as a comeback, let me share Rad’s favorite meat: the spare ribs.
Tonight, I decided to experiment a little bit. It is weekend, and we decided to spend the whole day inside the apartment just taking it easy so the ingredients are the things that I can find in my refrigerator only.
Ingredients:
spare ribs (4 cuts)
butter
1 potato
1 green bell pepper
2 rings pineapple
mushroom
half an onion
pepper
about 2 tbsp oyster sauce
1 tbsp soy sauce
water
lettuce (as garnish)
Procedure:
1. Sprinkle shio-kosho (a mixture of salt and fine pepper) on the ribs and fry in butter until brown.
2. Put in onion and potato and fry some more (use moderate heat).
3. Mix in oyster sauce and soy sauce until they are incorporated in the meat and potatoes. Sprinkle ground black pepper. Pour about 3/4 cup water and cover.
4. Mix in pineapple and mushroom.
5. Put in bell pepper when everything is cooked. The remaining heat is enough to cook the bell pepper and still have some crunch in it.
Usually, the meat that we buy are already so tender that we don’t even need a pressure cooker or cook for a long time. I think the amount of water would depend on how tender or hard the meat is.
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>Sinuglaw with Tako (He cooked! …and blogged!)

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Today, I came back late from school and so did Rad , from work. He assured me though that I won`t have to cook tonight because he will cook something that I would like to feature here in my blog. His “Sinuglaw”. Even if dinner was late, it was worth it because once again, I ate my heart out. So here is Sinuglaw, a popular dish from Davao, whose name apparently came from the fusion of “sinugba” meaning grill and “hilaw” or “kinilaw” meaning raw. He even insisted on writing something plus the recipe! Well, well, well… an instant guest blogger!

He says:


Late this afternoon when I was about to board my train back to Shizuoka the thought of Mindanao, specifically Davao came to me. I was more of a beach bum way back then and no summer passes by that I don’t stay at Samal island. I dunno, I may have had just a bad day, my mind was so dead tired, that I longed for the food of the island. Fresh sea foods. Specifically, the all time favourite kinilaw. So when I arrived at Shizuoka, took the bus home and got off at the supermarket to buy the ingredients. This time, my creative mind was awakened.

SINUGBA (INIHAW)— Grill

Ingredients:

  • pork chops
  • kikkoman soy sauce
  • salt
  • a dash of black pepper

— mix everything together then grill. It would be better if you can marinate the pork for a while before grilling. Then slice into bite sizes or in the same size as you would slice the tuna.


KINILAW (Raw)

Ingredients:

  • fresh tuna (maguro)
  • datu puti white vinegar (abt 3 tbsp)
  • a dash of salt
  • 1 lemon
  • 1/2 red bell pepper
  • 1/2 green bell pepper
  • 1/4 carrot
  • 1/2 onion
  • 1/2 ginger
  • *(all vegetables are cut into small bits)

1] While the pork is grilling, prepare the kinilaw or raw part. Slice tuna into cubes and mix with white vinegar add a dash of salt.
Toss until tuna meat is “cooked” (turns white).Discard the extra juice.

2] Toss tuna meat, ginger and onion with the lemon juice and put in the fridge or freezer till it is ready to serve. If you put it in the freezer, make sure that it won`t be too long for the mixture to freeze.

3] Slice/cut all other ingredients into small bits. You can either mix it together with or garnish afterwards for presentation.

——– We both like fresh octopus or tako so I put some in too. When everything is cut and ready, mix the grilled and the raw parts together. Serve immediately.

And I say,

Oh how I wish this happens everyday… or at least every week!
note: I love how the colors and came out in the picture that I will enter this at Laura`s Best Food Foto at Hey What`s For Dinner Mom! .Drop by and check her wonderful blog. And don`t forget to drop by on Monday (or is that Sunday, Tokyo time?) and cast a vote! For my photos of course.LOL!

>Cheese Tonkatsu – Pork Cutlets

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Rad`s favorite Japanese dish is Tonkatsu (豚カツ). Ton (豚)means pork and katsu (カツ) is the Katakana for “cut”, thus, the name.


We have always bought our tonkatsu from our neighbor Bento store who made such a mean tonkatsu bento and at the Hotto Motto along with “kare”. He had always seemed so content with just buying it whenever he feels the craving that I have never went on to make one for him myself. I was supposed to surprise him with a tonkatsu bento for his trip to Nagano tomorrow but I couldn`t wait so we had it for dinner tonight. My taste buds are shouting for cheese so tonkatsu with cheese it is.

Ingredients:
  • Pork Chops (pork loin or fillet)
  • Cheese
  • pepper
  • salt
  • flour
  • egg, beaten
  • bread crumbs, “panko”

Directions:
Prepare the flour, egg and bread crumps in three separate dishes or containers. Cut the pork at the side to create a pocket to insert the cheese in. Sprinkle pepper on the inside of the cutlet then insert the cheese. Put pepper and/or salt on the cutlet. Coat the cutlet lightly with flour then dip in beaten egg. Finally coat the pork with panko or breadcrumbs and pat it lightly. Heat the oil and wait for it to be about 150-160C before putting the pork. Cook one side till they are golden brown then turn to cook the other side. Serve with your favorite sauce (steak sauce, ketchup, etc.) and some vegetables (usually fresh shredded cabbage).

Be careful not to make the oil too hot or it might cook or even burn the coating immediately and end up with the pork not cooked at all. The amount of pepper or salt depends on personal tastes so you can just pepper it or go easy.

So, Mangantayon!

>Peppered Pork and Gingered Red Pepper

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Tomorrow is Marine Day or Ocean Day or Umi no Hi (海の日), a National Holiday. Although we do not necessarily abide by national holidays at the lab, I have decided not to take advantage of the holiday and that this be the last entry for this week and to seriously continue on the paper that I am supposed to be writing. Oh how I wish blogging could earn me that degree!

This was our dinner tonight. I am always on the lookout for easy to make recipes and this one I found from The Australian Women`s Weekly’s Cooking for Two recipe book.


Peppered Pork Ingredients:

  • 2 teaspoons drained green peppercorns, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 pork butterfly steaks
  • 1 tablespoon oil

Directions:

Combine peppercorns and sugar in bowl, rub over oth sides of steaks, cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Heat oil in pan, add pork, cook until browned and tender. This recipe can be prepared a day ahead.

The pork called for a side dish of gingered red pepper.

Gingered Red Pepper Ingredients:

  • 20g butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
  • 1 large red pepper, thinly sliced
  • 2 teaspoons honey

Directions:

Heat butter in pan, add ginger and pepper, cook, stirring, until pepper is just soft; stir in honey. This recipe must be made before serving.

Since I don’t have whole green peppercorns, I used the common ground pepper and two porkchops. For the gingered pepper, I made about 1 tablespoon of grated ginger and I used all of it anyway.

The whole meal also called for a recipe for Chinese cabbage but since I don’t have that in my supply, I steamed some spinach again but served it without the bonito shavings.

First, I tasted the porkchops, and I told Rad that they’re a bit bland. But he was ahead of me because he ate both the pork and the red pepper simultaneously. And it really was good! The combination of the sweet and ginger-spicy red pepper plus the peppered pork was so delicious and the steamed spinach was a the perfect neutralizer. It was so good, dinner was a flash. Or we really were that hungry. Mangantayon!